-so maybe we own a few books-

I read in a blog post recently that “the more books in one’s house, the more likely the children who live there will have more educational success.” The presence of books in the home is the biggest predictor of a child’s academic success. That helps me to justify this:

and this:

and this:

and this:

and this:

and this:

We don’t have satellite or cable, but we do have books. So far my children are doing well in school. I’d love for them to keep it up – to the extent that they can get a good portion of their college education paid for. 

How many of you were zooming in close to read the titles? I totally would be.

And how about that first picture? (I love that wall of shelves – Roger let me design them; then he built them for me as a Christmas gift one year.) Does that photo make you want to break into my house and organize? Or is that just me? I really want to pull everything off those shelves and re-alphabetize.

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About ruthie.voth

Wife of one, mother of four, friend of many. Lover of details, color, good conversations, finding balance, and being honest. Passionate lover of a well-crafted sentence - even more so if it's witty. Weird blend of cynical optimist. I'm the worst kind of woman. I'm high maintenance, but I think I'm low maintenance. Somehow, people still love me. Must be grace.
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7 Responses to -so maybe we own a few books-

  1. Hi Ruthie! One of the first things I did upon arriving in Omaha was get a library card. But when I go to the library or search the online catalog I get overwhelmed. And then I don’t want to spend time reading something random that may not be good. Would you give me a title or two? Love you by the way!

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    • ten4ruthie says:

      Biographical fiction? I just finished Just Jane by Nancy Moser and really enjoyed it. It’s a novel about Jane Austen’s life.
      Intriguing grown-up fiction? The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
      my favorite novel ever? A Room With a View by E.M. Forster
      Jesus-loving something-to-think-about nonfiction? Blue Like Jazz or Searching For God Knows What by Donald Miller. I just really love his writing. Sometimes I feel like he’s pulling words out of my own head.
      Something to read out loud with your husband; that will make you laugh? The Education of Hyman Kaplan by Leo Rosten
      Something to prove that ANYONE can publish a book and make money off of it? Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
      Short stories that are smart and entertaining? Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
      Raising and disciplining children? Creative Correction by Lisa Whelchel (The only parenting book I’ve ever been able to read straight through.)
      Poetry? I like The Ordering of Love by Madeleine L’Engle – Billy Collins is also wonderful; your cousin Joe introduced us to him.
      One of the best classics I’ve ever read? The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas. (But I probably wouldn’t have attempted that one when I was parenting a preschooler. It takes time and concentration.) 🙂
      Something intense? The circle trilogy by Ted Dekker (Black, Red, White – I haven’t read Green yet. I’ve heard it’s not as good…)
      Pre-teen fiction? The Birthday Ball by Lois Lowry. We listened to this one on audio, so maybe it was the superb reading that made me love it so much…
      Young adult fiction? I love Sharon Creech. She has a wide variety of writing styles. My favorite 2 of hers are probably Walk Two Moons and Heartbeat. (Heartbeat is written like a long free verse poem. It’s a lovely story, and a fairly quick read.)
      You might enjoy David Crowder’s book Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven But Nobody Wants to Die.
      There’s your title or two. Love you!

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      • thanks sister!! this is a fabulous categorical list! I think I will start with your favorite novel ever! Now next time I go to the library I will have an agenda other than Thomas videos and children’s picture books!

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  2. Scribbler says:

    Great Post! I am actually quite fond of the messy array of books! It has a homey feel to it. I have always wanted a home library.

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  3. Benj Shirk says:

    I love that you mentioned Susan Creech for young adult fiction? Walk Two Moons is one of my favorites. Gary Paulsen writes some good books especially adventures like “Dogsong” and “Hatchet.” Who needs TV when you can read and expand your world?

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    • ten4ruthie says:

      I agree. We’ve never had TV so we’ve never felt like we’re missing anything. And our little public library has a huge selection of DVDs. (Apparently we live in an illiterate county that requires information in audio or visual form.) I have several Gary Paulsen books that I keep trying to get my boys interested in. But they both have a thing for reading book series right now. If a book stands alone and doesn’t have a sequel, they don’t seem to think it’s worth their time. I don’t get it.

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  4. Aims says:

    I love your shelves of books! And I love to organize! AND I love you! Let’s combine them all…plan a trip to KY and get to work. 😉

    Like

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